Welding Careers in the Military

Welding in the armyWith America's military heavily engaged overseas, there is a definite demand for skilled trades in  all four branches of the Military, particularly for welders. And best of all, the military will not only provide you with top-notch training and education, they will also put you to work on real-world projects that will help you gain practical experience in the welding trade.

Once you fulfill your military commitment, you'll emerge with a high quality welding education, and the on-the-job training you need to land a great civilian job, and launch your welding career. In many cases, the welding specialization to which you are assigned as part of your duty service (fabricating parts, automobile repair, building ships, etc…) will put you ahead of the game in the civilian world, by giving you the practical experience necessary to pursue a particular career track in the welding industry.

Welding Jobs by Military Branch


Army welders are called upon to work in machine and repair shops, in addition to performing on-site construction and repair work in the field.

Machine and repair shops fabricate parts and make repairs for tanks, jeeps and other vehicles and equipment. In some cases, Army welders are called upon to make equipment and vehicle repairs in the field, as well as working on bridges and other construction projects, and structural repairs.


Many, regardless of their branch affiliations, consider the Navy to be the premier training ground for welders. The other three branches send most enlisted welding students to a welding school at the Aberdeen ordinance proving ground in Maryland. The Navy, however, has it's own welding school in the shipyards of Norfolk Virginia.

Hull Technician is one of the most commonly sought after welding positions, providing welders with the best training and practical experience the military has to offer.

Similar to Army welders, Navy welders also work in machine and repair shops, fabricating parts and performing repairs and maintenance in the field.

Air Force:

In addition to all of the tasks performed by Army welders, Air Force welders also work on aircraft. With the sophisticated nature of many of today's aircraft, however, there is less aircraft related work than you might think. Often, parts are simply replaced instead of repaired, and certain, highly critical, projects are farmed out to civilian repair shops staffed by specialized technicians.


The Marines are the smallest and most combat focused of the US Military's four branches of service. In comparison to the other branches, the Marines have a significantly smaller number of individuals involved in skilled trades. Referred to as Military Occupational Specialization (MOS), Marines who are assigned to a welding MOS may end up working with another branch, depending on their particular deployment, and therefore experience a full range of welding projects, potentially learning the specializations unique to each branch.

Starting off your welding career in the military can be a great way to go for many prospective welders, because you not only receive excellent training, free of charge, but your welding knowledge and savvy grows due to several years of practical, on-the-job experience. And this combination of education and practical experience can help you secure a great welding job once you complete your military commitment.

5 thoughts on “Welding Careers in the Military”

  1. Justin Whitford says:

    I would like to join the army as an apprentice welder. I was not sure how to apply.

  2. Henry says:

    i would like to join the us millitary to weld this website doesnt help.

  3. Baker's says:

    The following sites may offer more information and resources to help you in your research. After making the decision to join the Military as a welder, you will probably want to talk to a recruiter. Good luck!

  4. Laura says:

    Is it at all common for femal welders to join the military? I’ve done 3 years of welding in high school, and a year of college, however college didn’t help one bit… as i was only in the shop 3 hours a week… i did more welding in high school then i did college, so i am very interested in joining the military, please let me know

  5. ed says:

    Hi Laura, from what we’ve found the military observes all of the same legal requirements regarding discrimination that any employer would observe. I personally know a woman who served on the repair crew for helicopters, so it’s likely that you should be able to serve as a welder in the military. However, the main challenge will be finding a base that is looking for welders. According to the Army’s website, they cannot guarantee a precise career match. However, we have found specific welder posting on Indeed that are for military positions. You’ll probably have the most luck looking into a Navy position in a port city in either Virginia or along the Gulf coast. That seems to be where most of the Indeed job listings for military welders are concentrated of late. I also found this listing at the Army’s website: http://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs/browse-career-and-job-categories/mechanics/allied-trade-specialist.html.
    Also, don’t overlook the opportunities for job training in the Dakotas and Wisconsin! Keep an eye on our welding news round ups for more information about that. We post two news round ups each month, and there’s almost always an article about an employer offering training for new welders.

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